The Endangered Alphabets - Chittagong Hill Tract Project - The Marma Pro Typeface

 

The Project involved the development of several endangered writing systems from the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh. The idea was to take the scripts that are dying out and transform them into a fonts so the people could start using them and publish books in the hope of saving them.  I turned two of the scripts into typefaces.

 

The Marmas, sometimes referred to as the Mogh, live mostly in the Chittagong Hill Tracts.  According to the Marma writer Kya Shai Pro, the word “Marma” is derived from the “Mryma” or “Mraima,” hinting at the Marma roots in Myanmar, or Burma. According to the philologists, the Marma language belongs to the Burmese group of the Tibeto-Burman language family. The Marma alphabet, “Marmaza” or “Marimacha” originates from the ancient sub-continental Brahmi alphabet that had left-to-right writing style. It is known that the people of Krishna and Godabar areas of south India migrated to several areas of southeast Burma in the sixth century. The Marma tongue, then, is a dialect descended from the Burmese language. There are 45 letters in the Marma alphabet (33 consonants and 12 vowels), plus several alternative letters, 25 diacritic and punctuation marks, numerals 0-9 and glyphs that allow for stacked alphabet forms. The Marma script is an offshoot of the Burmese script, though there are several differences between the two, such as sound, and how some of the letters are used.

 

 The ST Marma Pro typeface currently comes in 3 weights containing all the above features. Marma Pro takes into consideration the traditional form of the Marma letters by researching into the native users tools, materials and methods and then development into how these can be applied to the design of a typeface while maintaining typographic form and readability.

For any further information please visit: endangeredalphabets.com

 

specimen down loads:

poster | book

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Copyright © 2016 Sanalitro. Graphic Design Studio, Cambridge

The Endangered Alphabets - Chittagong Hill Tract Project - The Marma Pro Typeface

 

The Project involved the development of several endangered writing systems from the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh. The idea was to take the scripts that are dying out and transform them into a fonts so the people could start using them and publish books in the hope of saving them.  I turned two of the scripts into typefaces.

 

The Marmas, sometimes referred to as the Mogh, live mostly in the Chittagong Hill Tracts.  According to the Marma writer Kya Shai Pro, the word “Marma” is derived from the “Mryma” or “Mraima,” hinting at the Marma roots in Myanmar, or Burma. According to the philologists, the Marma language belongs to the Burmese group of the Tibeto-Burman language family. The Marma alphabet, “Marmaza” or “Marimacha” originates from the ancient sub-continental Brahmi alphabet that had left-to-right writing style. It is known that the people of Krishna and Godabar areas of south India migrated to several areas of southeast Burma in the sixth century. The Marma tongue, then, is a dialect descended from the Burmese language. There are 45 letters in the Marma alphabet (33 consonants and 12 vowels), plus several alternative letters, 25 diacritic and punctuation marks, numerals 0-9 and glyphs that allow for stacked alphabet forms. The Marma script is an offshoot of the Burmese script, though there are several differences between the two, such as sound, and how some of the letters are used.

 

 The ST Marma Pro typeface currently comes in 3 weights containing all the above features. Marma Pro takes into consideration the traditional form of the Marma letters by researching into the native users tools, materials and methods and then development into how these can be applied to the design of a typeface while maintaining typographic form and readability.

For any further information please visit: endangeredalphabets.com

 

specimen down loads:

poster | book

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The Endangered Alphabets - Chittagong Hill Tract Project - The Marma Pro Typeface

 

The Project involved the development of several endangered writing systems from the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh. The idea was to take the scripts that are dying out and transform them into a fonts so the people could start using them and publish books in the hope of saving them.  I turned two of the scripts into typefaces.

 

The Marmas, sometimes referred to as the Mogh, live mostly in the Chittagong Hill Tracts.  According to the Marma writer Kya Shai Pro, the word “Marma” is derived from the “Mryma” or “Mraima,” hinting at the Marma roots in Myanmar, or Burma. According to the philologists, the Marma language belongs to the Burmese group of the Tibeto-Burman language family. The Marma alphabet, “Marmaza” or “Marimacha” originates from the ancient sub-continental Brahmi alphabet that had left-to-right writing style. It is known that the people of Krishna and Godabar areas of south India migrated to several areas of southeast Burma in the sixth century. The Marma tongue, then, is a dialect descended from the Burmese language. There are 45 letters in the Marma alphabet (33 consonants and 12 vowels), plus several alternative letters, 25 diacritic and punctuation marks, numerals 0-9 and glyphs that allow for stacked alphabet forms. The Marma script is an offshoot of the Burmese script, though there are several differences between the two, such as sound, and how some of the letters are used.

 

 The ST Marma Pro typeface currently comes in 3 weights containing all the above features. Marma Pro takes into consideration the traditional form of the Marma letters by researching into the native users tools, materials and methods and then development into how these can be applied to the design of a typeface while maintaining typographic form and readability.

For any further information please visit: endangeredalphabets.com

 

specimen down loads:

poster | book